Successful Resume/Cover Letter Combination Call back

I’m excited to share this with fellow job seekers because as we know, finding a job can be daunting.  It is a job in itself and it takes much energy, however, you cannot let yourself be discouraged by rejection letters.  So here I will share with you an example of a resume and cover letter I wrote that proved worthy of an interview.

Since I’m not sure about copyright laws, the use of trademarked names, or what the owner of the company will think about me using their business as an example, I will leave out specific names, addresses, and other identifiable information from this post.

My career counselor from my local OneStop Career center sent me a follow up email congratulating me on the completion of my BPI training course.  She also shared with me a job opening that is seeking a BPI Certified Building Analyst to fill an Energy Auditor position in their company–for precautionary measures we’ll call them, “Energy Performance Company.”

This is their job flier:

the job listing

I sent them this cover letter:

the cover letter

And I sent them this resume:

the resume

Because I am a grammar fiend, and sometimes overly meticulous, it took about 4 hours for me to write, edit, and send both documents to the contact provided in the flier.  When composing my email, I double checked the contact’s email address, entitled the subject field as “RE: [Energy Performance Company] Building Analyst/Energy Auditor,” and copied and pasted the cover letter to the body.  I adjusted some lines and spacing in the email’s body in order to maintain similar, if not the exact, formatting as my word document.  And most importantly, I attached both my resume and cover letter to the email.

Tip: When sending crafted resumes and cover letters, remember to save your word documents as a *.doc file if you are using a MS Office version that automatically saves in *.docx so it is compatible with previous MS Office editions.  (Go here to learn how.)

It has been recommended to me that I write a tailored resume for each job description.  You can and should have a general resume to hand out at job fairs, to keep in your car, or to carry to networking events, but when sending a professional marketing piece to a potential employer, the resume should be written specifically for the job description.  Notice how, in my resume, I used the same or similar words to what they provided in their listing.  I circled them in red so that you can get an idea of how I integrated what they were looking for with the skills I possessed.

The job listing was sent out April 18th, I sent my response April 19th, and got a call on the afternoon of April 20th.  I have a meeting with the company Tuesday April 26th.  I hope it goes well–wish me luck!

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5 thoughts on “Successful Resume/Cover Letter Combination Call back

  1. Pingback: Updates: Exercise Regiment Reevaluation and Job Hunt | Bryan's Blend

  2. Lee

    So, how did it go? Great job being meticulous, it’s important when preparing cover letters and resumes. Most people do not invest the time needed to build a quality letter and resume, but they are “the way in” to the job of your dreams, so effort should be invested.

    You prove the point, It only took you a day to get the call!

    Reply
    1. Bryan Post author

      So it went well! All of that resume building and research paid off–I got a job! I’ve now been with a small solar energy systems contractor that is close to home, pays ok, and is giving me an opportunity to learn and grow. Thanks for reading! PS. what industry are you in?

      Reply
  3. Konstantin

    Bryan, thank you for a good example of how to apply for job postings, with live examples and very nice and clear additional explanations. I wish you a great luck!

    Reply
    1. Bryan Post author

      Thank you for reading. Good luck to you as well! Let me know how it goes if you end up using some of the methods I listed here.

      Reply

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